Browsing All Posts filed under »api«

A possible next step for hoard.it?

March 2, 2010

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I first wrote about hoard.it, the bootstrapped “API spider” that Dan Zambonini and I built, back in 2008. We followed up the technology with a paper for Museums and the Web 2009, and in that paper talked about some possible future directions for the service. You’ll see if you scroll down the paper that there […]

The Brooklyn Museum API – Q&A with Shelley Bernstein and Paul Beaudoin

April 16, 2009

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The concept and importance of museum-based API’s are notions that I’ve written about consistently (boringly, probably) both on this blog and elsewhere on the web. Programmatic and open access to data is – IMO – absolutely key to ensuring the long-term success of online collections. Many conversations have been going on about how to make […]

(Selling) content in a networked age

April 1, 2009

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I’m just back from Torquay where I’d been asked to speak at the 32nd annual UKSG conference. I first came across UKSG more than a year ago when they asked me to speak at a London workshop they were hosting. Back then, I did a general overview of API’s from a non-technical perspective. This time […]

Omeka – an online exhibits framework

March 17, 2008

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Tom Scheinfeldt contacted me through a comment on the Electronic Museum blog. He’s MD of the Center for History and New Media (CHNM) who among other things produce Zotero – a kind of semantic webby bookmarking toolbar. CHNM have recently produced an open source application called Omeka (Swahili for “to display or lay out goods […]

The progress of content

January 8, 2008

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I’m just helping Brian Kelly author a paper on Openness in Museums for the Museums and the Web conference later in the year. It just stuck me that the movement of content around the web has followed / is following a pattern a little bit like this: Phase I: content held as HTML within sites. […]

Facebook poll: flawed, but do you care?

November 25, 2007

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The long and frankly fairly boring (to those other than people like me, and probably you if you’re reading this..) debate continues about Facebook data – who owns it, who shares it, how it can be attributed, how open it is. Techcrunch as always pile into the debate with a simple point and a simple […]

Amazon announces SLA for S3

October 9, 2007

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One of the fears which cloud computing – or any hosted application – brings out in museum and other IT professionals is that your up-time becomes reliant on services over which you have no control. I’ve always argued that although this is a real fear, it’s infinitely more likely that the ropy single machine you’ve […]