Browsing All Posts filed under »innovation«

The Brooklyn Museum API – Q&A with Shelley Bernstein and Paul Beaudoin

April 16, 2009

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The concept and importance of museum-based API’s are notions that I’ve written about consistently (boringly, probably) both on this blog and elsewhere on the web. Programmatic and open access to data is – IMO – absolutely key to ensuring the long-term success of online collections. Many conversations have been going on about how to make […]

Creative Spaces – just…why?

March 4, 2009

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There’s been a fair bit of buzz around the launch of the NMOLP (National Museums Online Learning Project) – now apparently renamed as “Creative Spaces” for launch. I’ve known about this project for a long while – when I was at the Science Museum, very initial discussions were taking place at the V&A about how […]

The person is the point

February 6, 2009

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This is just going to be a quickie, mainly so I get it out before I go away on holiday never to remember it again. At some point I might expand on it. Over the last few weeks in particular, we’ve seen the public finally sitting up and noticing Twitter. It’s been on the BBC, […]

Specification Hell

January 6, 2009

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I just spent my afternoon working on a 50-page functional specification.  Now that I’ve been on the agency side for more than a year, I’m confident in reporting that agencies hate reading specifications almost as much as clients hate writing them.  The world is full of dry documents, and I try (probably like most people) […]

Launchball: we did it differently, and got it right..

March 11, 2008

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Yesterday there was a flurry of excitement on Twitter (a “flutter of tweets”?) as the Science Museum’s Launchball was named SXSW “Best of Show“. This is an awesome achievement. SXSW is a hugely well regarded conference and for a museum to win not only the Games section but the coveted BOS as well is just […]

Live(ish) from Google, Paris

February 12, 2008

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I’m in Paris at the Google HQ. Eduserv are now a Google Enterprise Partner and I’m learning all about the Google Appliance. I’ve been pretty interested in the environment which is Google Paris – how it feels, what’s different about it, and why – and I’m blogging about it over on the Eduserv PSG blog. […]

All noise, no signal. Lifestreaming is a timesink

January 25, 2008

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The fascination with various “lifestreaming” tools continues apace. Brian Kelly has been getting particularly excited about the regulation (or not, as his fellow Twitterers are shouting) of these tools. “We should have standards” he says. “No! Standards are boring”, everyone replies… In this particular area I have to say I pretty much fall on the […]

Scarcity vs scale

January 14, 2008

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I’ve been finishing off the openness paper this week (taking me a long time to get my ideas together at the mo..) and doing some thinking around how you manage to still make money in this brave new world of free, open, readily available everything. Actually, let’s not call it making money but creating value, […]

King Knol

December 18, 2007

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(^ That title was vaguely supposed to be a play on “King Knut” but it didn’t really work out…) Seb has posted about an article on OpenCulture where the author compares Google’s Knol project to Wikipedia. OpenCulture ultimately comes down hard on Google, reckoning that the Wikipedia “editing by masses” model is a better one. […]

Facebook poll: flawed, but do you care?

November 25, 2007

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The long and frankly fairly boring (to those other than people like me, and probably you if you’re reading this..) debate continues about Facebook data – who owns it, who shares it, how it can be attributed, how open it is. Techcrunch as always pile into the debate with a simple point and a simple […]